Come alive

I just found this fantastic quote:

‘Don’t ask yourself what the world needs; ask yourself what makes you come alive. And then go and do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.’

Harold Whitman (Historian)

I found it here while looking for more training courses in Nonviolent Communication (NVC) after having just completed one last weekend, in London, with Gina Lawrie.

Oddly coincidental, I just stumbled upon this:

“In every bit of honest writing in the world, there is a base theme. Try to understand men, if you understand each other you will be kind to each other. Knowing a man well never leads to hate and almost always leads to love”

John Steinbeck

Which is a pretty good corollary of Marshall Rosenberg‘s NVC.

Lindy Hop made me come alive between 2000 and 2004. I’m kinda missing something now. Since Kenya I’ve been searching on-and-off for something that makes me come alive. There are a number of themes and things that almost got blogged that lead here (I’ve been putting them off till the broadband got sorted).

I booked last weekend’s course at the last minute and paid a consequently high price for my ‘budget’ flight back to the UK. Then I missed the ‘plane. Standing in the airport, I imagined my weekend as it might unfold with and without doing the course. The answer was clear. I went back to Rennes and booked an even more last-minute Eurostar ticket to Waterloo. I’m so glad I Did. The course was excellent and now I want more.

If you’re curious what this is all about, read the first chapter of Marshall Rosenberg’s book.

One Comment

  1. Mark Says:

    And Steinbeck also wrote this:

    The hell with it. There aint no sin and there aint no virtue, there’s just stuff people do. Its all part of the same thing. And some of the things folks do is nice and some ain’t nice,.but that’s as far as any man got a right to say

    Thanks to Jim for lending me The Grapes Of Wrath.

    This is the principle of not being judgmental and accepting people as they are. This is something I have been thinking about a lot since our Buddhist weekend and since reading David Brazier’s book.