Desire is the engine of becoming

First day partly done: we have another session in half an hour, hopefully I can knock out a quick entry before then.The title of this entry is something one of my fellow students said earlier today. I love it. He’s making out that he doesn’t enjoy being quoted.

Speaking of quotes, here is another, this time not from here, but something I wanted to look up while I’m on-line, as it seems relevant to what we were talking about this morning.

Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.
Helen Keller

The interesting thing about re-discovering this quote is to find out a bit more about the woman who said it. Her name above is a link to the Wikipedia page on her life. Take a quick look, and be inspired.

While on the subject of memorable soundbites, here is another from today:

Friendship is the most fertile ground in which the tree of knowledge can grow
Satish Kumar

And, finally, I learned that Manfred Max-Neef has taught courses on “stupidology” at MIT. How’s that for a bit of NLP? Let’s make a model of what makes the species stupid. Animals don’t need Starbucks, Slash-and-burn, Battery farms or Tescos; why do we?

So what did we do today? In the morning we had an induction to the college: talks from the kitchen manager, house manager and garden manager. The kitchen guy, Wayne, was inspirational: took us into his food-store and told how inspirational was the shelf full of plastic tubs of pulses, because when he arrived at the college it was full of tetrapaks of stuff like soya milk, which they now make themselves. The garden man was cool too: he told how they transformed bramble patches into forest gardens. There is hope yet for the jungle at the back of my flat in Cambridge.

3 Comments

  1. Chris Says:

    So is desire not the cause of all suffering any more? (Buddhism, 2nd noble truth of)

    God, I can’t keep up with philosophy, it moves at such a breakneck speed. (Aristotle, 320BC)

  2. Mark Says:

    Hi Chris,

    I don’t actually know much about what the Noble Truths are, my introduction to them was via a The Feeling Buddha by David Brazier that offers what is, perhaps, a non-“standard” interpretation of Samudaya, that I prefer to “the root of all suffering”. i remember talking to you about this before and finding that we had different ideas of what the noble truths were, the reason seems to be, I’m embarrassed to say, that I’m not actually particularly well read on the subject. D’oh!

  3. Tygger Says:

    Fascinating! Hope you have a good week … and glad that you’re back to regular blogging. Looking forward too to seeing you mid Feb 🙂

    Huggles
    Tyg